Scientific Papers (Literature repository)

Djebali S, et al. Nature. 2012. 489(7414):101-8.      Original Site

publicationType Journal        Show Detail          Search Related Information  
PMID 22955620  
author/publisher
Djebali S, Davis CA, Merkel A, Dobin A, Lassmann T, Mortazavi A, Tanzer A, Lagarde J, Lin W, Schlesinger F, Xue C, Marinov GK, Khatun J, Williams BA, Zaleski C, Rozowsky J, Röder M, Kokocinski F, Abdelhamid RF, Alioto T, Antoshechkin I, Baer MT, Bar NS,...,
Yoshihide HAYASHIZAKI,
Harrow J, Gerstein M, Hubbard T, Reymond A, Antonarakis SE, Hannon G, Giddings MC, Ruan Y, Wold B,,
Piero CARNINCI,
Guigó R, Gingeras TR.
     Show Detail      
organization Functional Genomics Technology Team        Show Detail          Search Related Information  
journal Nature        Show Detail          Search Related Information  
title Landscape of transcription in human cells.  
volume 489  
number (issue) 7414  
page 101-8  
publishYear 2012  
Abstract Eukaryotic cells make many types of primary and processed RNAs that are found either in specific subcellular compartments or throughout the cells. A complete catalogue of these RNAs is not yet available and their characteristic subcellular localizations are also poorly understood. Because RNA represents the direct output of the genetic information encoded by genomes and a significant proportion of a cell's regulatory capabilities are focused on its synthesis, processing, transport, modification and translation, the generation of such a catalogue is crucial for understanding genome function. Here we report evidence that three-quarters of the human genome is capable of being transcribed, as well as observations about the range and levels of expression, localization, processing fates, regulatory regions and modifications of almost all currently annotated and thousands of previously unannotated RNAs. These observations, taken together, prompt a redefinition of the concept of a gene.  
RIKEN press release ("reference" is Djebali S, et al. N...) Comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human ENCODE cells        Show Detail          Search Related Information